Learning With The Cat In The Hat
Paint Lesson Plan
 
 
 
 

Name: Matt Tindall
Grade Level: Pre-K

*Annotation
The Learning with The Cat In The Hat lesson could be used with children in Pre-K through third grade.  This lesson is designed for kindergarten level students.  The students will begin with a hands-on technology activity of a Paint picture with a summary of the literature story.  The students will have the opportunity to explore the Microsoft Paint Program.  This is a cross-curricular lesson integrating technology, art, and language arts skills.

*Primary Learning Outcome:
With teacher guidance, students will be able to use the mouse while operating the computer and develop a picture using a drawing program.  Students will discuss questions about literature story.  How do you use the mouse to make the page move up and down (scroll)?  Describe how you made your picture on the computer.  What do you like best about The Cat in The Hat? (question from story)  If you were the Cat In The Hat, what would you keep in The Fun-In-A-Box?  After you finished playing and having fun, would you make sure to clean up after yourself?

*Assessed QCC:

Grade: K
Technology Integration
Strand: Basic Skills
5
Topic: Basic Skills
Standard: Operates basic technology tools and applications.

Grade: K
Fine Arts
Strand: Visual Arts
3
Topic: Artistic Skills and Knowledge: Creating, Performing, Producing
Standard: Uses a variety of art materials and techniques to model, construct, and compose original artworks.

Grade: K
Language Arts
Strand: Written Communication
39
Topic: Literature
Standard: Responds to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about literature.
 

*Total Duration:
It will take about 45 minutes to an hour to teach this lesson.
 

*Materials and Equipment:
1. Book, The Cat In The Hat, by Dr. Suess
2. Computer with Internet connection
3. Drawing program
4. Printer
5. Disks (one for each studentís picture)
6. Pencil and paper

Technology Connection:
Computer with Internet connection, printer, drawing program, and website:
http://www.valdosta.edu/~mjtindal/paint.html

Procedures:
Step One
Introduce students to the MS Paint picture and summary of the book, The Cat In The Hat, on the Internet (see URL above).  Discuss the story, picture, and questions with the students.  Teacher will read book, The Cat In The Hat by Dr. Suess to students.  Students will discuss answers to questions about the story.  Questions: If you were the Cat In The Hat, what would you keep in the Fun-In-A-Box?  After you finished having fun and playing, would you make sure to clean up after yourself? Tell why you selected your next place and what you and your class would do there.  During this process teacher will give assistance when needed.

Estimated Time:
About 25 minutes

Lesson Materials to be Attached:
Copy of: The Cat In The Hat by Dr. Suess Web Page

Annotation:
Copy of website developed for this lesson plan.
http://www.valdosta.edu/~mjtindal/paint.html

Web Link for Step One:
Title: The Cat In The Hat by Dr. Suess found on http://www.valdosta.edu/~mjtindal/paint.html

URL:
http://www.valdosta.edu/~mjtindal/paint.html

Annotation:
Website with Paint picture summary and questions.

Step Two
Teacher will read book, The Cat In The Hat Returns by Dr. Suess, to students.  Students will discuss answers to questions about the story.  Questions: If you were with The Cat In The Hat, what would you want to do for fun?  The colors of The Cat In The Hat's hat are red and white.  What colors would you make his hat?   During this process teacher will give assistance when needed.

Estimated Time:
About 10 minutes

Step Three
Show students how to open the Paint program and demonstrate some of the Paint tools.  Students will explore with the Paint program and draw a picture about the story or questions.  Save studentsí Paint pictures on disks.  Print 2 copies of the studentís paint picture (one for student and one for technology notebook).

Estimated Time:
About 15 minutes
 

Step Four
Students will discuss and share their drawing products with their peers.

Estimated Time:
About 5 minutes
 

*Assessment:

Student will be assessed through observation while using the mouse to control the computer and using the drawing program.
Satisfactory: Student is able to control the computer and use the mouse to view the Paint Web page and explore the drawing program.
Unsatisfactory: Student is not able to control the computer or use the mouse when viewing the Paint Web page and exploring the drawing program.

Studentís product will be assessed for answers to the questions.
Satisfactory: Student is able to write or dictate answers that make sense to the presented questions in reference to the story.
Unsatisfactory: Student is not able to write or dictate answers that make sense to the presented questions.

Student will be assessed by the development of a picture using the drawing program with or without the assistance of the teacher.
Satisfactory: Student is able to develop a picture through the use of the drawing program with or without the assistance of the teacher.
Unsatisfactory: Student is not able to develop a picture through the use of the drawing program with or without the assistance of the teacher.
 

Accommodation:
Using the computer one-on-one with my special student would allow for her to recieve the special attention she requires.  It would also allow for her to use some self-control on her part involving her emotional behavior disorder.  Allowing her to use the computer can be used as a reward tactic for proper behavior.  Information Links for Accommodations for Special Students.)
 

Reflections:

1. During the reading of The Cat In The Hat, the two students displayed a curiosity towards items they recognized on the pages.  They recognized items such as books, tables, and etc.  Then they recalled where they had seen these items before.  Their attention was also directed toward the drawn facial expressions of the characters in the book.  If the cat in the hat was frowning the students would identify that the cat was feeling sad.  If he was smiling, they would identify this as happiness.  I read this book in the computer lab with a fear that the students may pay more attention to the computers than the words from the book.  However, they paid full attention throughout the reading and used their new found knowledge of the book to draw constructive pictures.  

  2. If the students wanted to know something they would ask.  Instead of only hearing and accepting the story, they would give their feelings on certain situations throughout the book.  During the book, the cat in the hat creates a mess while trying to entertain.  The students understood the dangers of the cat carrying his "fun" too far for meager entertainment.  Furthermore, the students were very creative with thier answers.  As I asked them what they would keep in the fun-in-a-box, they would reply with an abstract answer.  When someone thinks of a box they may think of something no larger than a bread or computer box; except these students.  One student said she would keep a car in the box, similar to a garage.  The other replied by suggesting a horse could fit in the box.    

3. This lesson was great for the students to flex their creative muscles, as well as their retrieval ability.  Although, I would focus more on the understanding of the emotions of the characters in the book.  When the students identified emotional aspects in the story I would ask them why the characters were reacting that way.  Both of the students were able to recall with little difficulty the turning points which lead to the emotions of the characters.  In order to add another element to this lesson, I would have the students apply an understanding of how the emotions came about in the characters.

   Students' Scanned Pictures from Paint Lesson
Lesson Taught by Matt Tindall with a Pre-K Class at Lowndes Headstart

 

Book Title for Paint Project
The Cat In The Hat by Dr. Suess
 Cover of Book 
 

 

Questions from Paint Lesson
1.If you were the Cat in the Hat, what would you keep in the Fun-In-A-Box?   

2. After you finished having fun and playing, would you make sure to clean up after yourself? 

Student #1's version of The Cat In The Hat
Answers & Comments to Paint Lesson
1.  Student 1 -- "I would keep a horse." 
      
2.  Student 1 -- "I'm always told to clean up because someone could get hurt by toys being left out.     
Pictures form the Paint Lesson 
Description of picture and comments made by student
This is a picture from The Cat In The Hat by Dr. Suess.
 
 
Student #2's version of The Cat In The Hat
Answers & Comments to Paint Lesson
1. Student 2 -- "I would have a car in the box." 

2. Student 2 -- "Yes, I clean up to be good."

Pictures form the Paint Lesson 
Description of picture and comments made by student
This is a picture of the Cat In The Hat with Thing 1 and Thing 2.  They are inside of the house infront of the brother and sister.

 
 

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