Exploring the Home of Pokemon!

This page was developed for Ms. Moses' third grade class at S.L. Mason Elementary School by Emily Cason, Valdosta State University Preservice Teacher.

On this webpage, you will explore Japan, a wonderful and amazing country, which is the home of Pokemon!

1.  Did you know that the people from Japan love cherry blossom trees?  Find out why and learn about their climate here.

2.  Have you ever wondered what kind of toys Japanese children have?  Do  you think they have the same kind of toys that you play with?  Find out by clicking here.

3.  Would you like to know the correct way of eating with chopsticks?  Go to this site to learn how.

4.  It would be so cool to be able to speak Japanese.  You can learn how to count from one to thirty in Japanese at this site!
ichi...ni...san...

5.  Have you ever wondered what kind of sports the people of Japan play?  Click here to learn all about their sports.

6.  Would you like to know what kind of clothes the Japanese wore traditionally?  Well, what are you waiting for?

7.  The Japanese enjoy listening to nature sounds, such as crickets and the ocean.  Put on your headphones and then click here to hear some of their favorite nature sounds.

8.  Wouldn't it be awesome to be able to say some Japanese words and phrases?  Click here to learn.

9.  Some people of Japan enjoy making paper folding art, which is called Origami.  They can make almost anything out of paper...people and animals and flowers and ...

10.  The Japanese put a lot of time and work into their gardens.  That is why they are so beautiful!  Click below to see more Japanese gardens.


Take a bow, you did a wonderful job!  I bet you learned a lot about Japan.  Pokemon thanks you for visiting his home.

I worked with Rashida and James in Ms. Moses' class.  After visiting the websites about Japan, they each did the first activity.  They drew their own picture of a Japanese garden and labeled it foreground, middle ground, and background.  I really enjoyed working with them both, and  I think they learned a lot about Japan.

Rashida's Japanese Garden

James' Japanese Garden



 
 
 

1. Grade Level: Recommended Grade Level  third grade
2. Approximate Time of Activity Activity can be completed in 30 to 45 minutes.
3. Two Integrated Subject Areas   Fine arts and technology
4. Rationale: Reasons this activity is important This activity is important because it teaches students how to differentiate between foreground, middle ground, and background by using pictures from the Internet.
5. Goals:  QCC Standard for State of Georgia Georgia's QCC:
1.Fine Arts; Grade 3; Critical Analysis & Aesthetic Understanding; #12 Points out division of space in artworks as foreground, middle ground, and background.
6. Objectives of this Activity   The students will explore foreground, middle ground, and background by using the Internet.
7. Activity Sequence: including link to Web Site Connection 1. After visiting this Web site about Japan, students will view pictures of Japanese gardens
2. Students will point out to teacher which part of the picture is foreground, middle ground, and background.
3. Then students will draw their favorite Japanese garden picture and label foreground, middle ground, and background.
1. Grade Level: Recommended grade level   Third Grade 
2. Approximate Time of Activity Activity can be completed in 30 to 45 minutes.
3. Two Integrated Subject Areas   Fine Arts and technology
4. Rationale: Reasons this activity is important This activity is important because it teaches students about the culture of Japan and helps them create two-dimensional and three-dimensional art forms.
5. Goals:  QCC Standard for State of Georgia Georgia's QCC:
1. Fine Arts; Grade 3; Artistic Skills and Knowledge: Creating, Performing, Producing;  #3 Creates artwork using implied texture in two-dimensional shapes and actual             texture in three-dimensional forms. 
6. Objectives of this Activity   The students will learn the art and culture of Japan. 
7. Activity Sequence: including link to Web Site Connection 1. After visiting this Web Site and learning about Japan, discuss uses of fans such as funcional use and artistic use.
2. Fold 12 x 18 white paper in half horizontally, like a book.
3. You may want to first make a template.  On the folded side, draw half of a fan shape (like a rainbow) and cut.  The piece will resemble a rainbow shape.
4. Lightly draw a picture from nature, possibly a Japanese garden. 
5. Using watercolor, make bold brush strokes.  Use several colors or paint with the seasons.  Let dry.
6. Fold the paper back and forth, creasing each time.  Gather the paper together to form the fan and staple or glue.
7. Tape two popsicle sticks together to form a handle, and then glue to fan.
8. Display it and enjoy the lesson!



 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Emily's HUB Page

emcason@valdosta.edu

Fun and Educational Web Sites by VSU Preservice Teachers