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Turpentine Stills ( section three )

Turpentine Stills:  section one | section two | section three

   

18. Old wooden barrels with stave, made by coopers,  and the newer industrial metal barrels which replaced them, used for the collection of gum in the woods, on the site of the McCranie Turpentine Still, Willacoochee.  Photo by Tim Prizer, 2003.

 

       
   

19. Another angle of the McCranie Turpentine Still  shows the rosin shed to the right and the gum skids to the left. Photo by Tim Prizer, 2003. 

 

 

20. Former turpentiner Gillis Carter of Willacoochee stands in front of a tractor at the McCranie Turpentine Still site.  In front of him is an old whet stone, used for sharpening tools. Photo by Tim Prizer, 2003.
21. A look at the abandoned buildings that were once the Varn Turpentine Still in Hoboken.  The Varn family has been in naval stores since right after the Civil War. They bought the Larkin still in Hoboken and had stilling operations until 1982. The Varns were the first in Georgia to utilize the new steam distillation techniques developed at the Olustee (Florida) Naval Stores Laboratory, which replaced the old fire stilling process. Photo by Tim Prizer, 2003.
       
    22. Some windswept and rusted turpentine gum barrels standing on the property that formerly held the Varn turpentine still in Hoboken (at the corner of Highway 82 and Highway 121).  Photo by Tim Prizer, 2003.
    23. The Varn Sawmill in Hoboken continued the Varn family association with the forest industry after their naval stores operation closed. Project interviewees Willie White and Ralph Wilkerson worked first in the Varn turpentine operation and now at the mill.  Photo by Tim Prizer, 2003.
    24.The last commercial still in the U.S. was operated by the Netherlands-based Akzo Nobel Company in Baxley, Georgia.  Here, the last barrels of domestic turpentine in the U.S., from Soperton Naval Stores, are unloaded, August 2001. Photo by Bill Godfrey courtesy Georgia Forestry Commission Magazine.

 
25. Weighing the last barrels of domestic turpentine in the U.S., from Soperton Naval Stores, at the Akzo Nobel still, Baxley, August, 2001.  Photo by Bill Godfrey courtesy Georgia Forestry Commission Magazine.
26. Processing the last barrels, using the modern steam distillation techniques, Akzo Nobel still, Baxley, August, 2001. This is the end of an era for gum naval stores in Georgia and the United States. Photo by Bill Godfrey courtesy Georgia Forestry Commission Magazine.
27. Processing the last barrels, using the modern steam distillation techniques, Akzo Nobel still, Baxley, August, 2001. This is the end of an era for gum naval stores in Georgia and the United States. Photo by Bill Godfrey courtesy Georgia Forestry Commission Magazine.
28. Processing the last barrels, using the modern steam distillation techniques, Akzo Nobel still, Baxley, August, 2001. This is the end of an era for gum naval stores in Georgia and the United States. Photo by Bill Godfrey courtesy Georgia Forestry Commission Magazine.

Turpentine Stills:  section one | section two | section three

 

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